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Eid Milad-un-Nabi-Mawlid 2021: Importance And History

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Eid Milad-un-Nabi-Mawlid 2021 And 12 Rabi ul-Awwal: Importance And History

The last prophet of Islam, Prophet Mummmad (peace and blessings be upon him) was born in the third month of the Islamic year, which is Rabi ul-Awwal. Milad-un-Nabi is the birthday of the Prophet and is observed in a similar way by Muslims around the world. Here are the details about the importance and history of this day.

What is Milad-un-Nabi?

Also known as Mawlid, Mawlid un Nabi Sharif, and Eid Milad, Milad-un-Nabi is the auspicious occasion of Prophet Muhammad Saheb’s birthday. The literal meaning of the word Mawlid is to give birth, which comes from the Arabic language. The contemporary usage however refers to the birth of the Prophet specifically.

What is 12 Rabi ul-Awwal?

Mawlid is observed on 12 Rabi ul-Awwal every year. Since Islamic calendar is a lunar calendar, the date as per the English calendar varies year to year. The date for Milad-un-Nabi 2021 is October 19th. It starts on the evening of 18th October and ends on the evening of the next day, which is the 19th.

Eid Milad-un-Nabi History & Significance

The history of Eid Milad revolves around the time when Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings be upon him) was born in Makkah in 570 CE. However, the popularity of Eid-e-Milad began during the 8th century after the Prophet’s house was converted to a prayer hall. This was done by the then Caliph, Harun-al-Rashid’s mother, Al-Khizuran.

Also, at that time, the day was observed very differently from the way it is observed today. Going back to the 11th century, Mawlid was only celebrated in Egypt by the leading clan. Later in the day, people used to recite and offer prayers and then people from the ruling clan gave speeches and verses from the Holy Quran. It was only in the 12th century, that other Muslim countries such as Syria, Turkey, Morocco, and Spain started to celebrate this day.

Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings be upon him) is the last messenger of Allah Almighty, and a man of wise words, honesty, and mercy on all human beings. The entire humanity has been blessed by the birth of Prophet Muhammad and therefore any day related to his life is of great significance for Muslims irrespective of geographical boundaries. On this day, the believers greet his birthday to show their love and devotion to the Prophet (PBUH). This festival is all about remembering and regarding the teachings of the Holy Prophet.

What do Muslims do on Mawlid?

Mawlid is observed by remembering Prophet Muhammad’s teachings. Muslims offer prayers and narrate verses from the Holy Quran. They also wear new clothes, cook and eat special food with their loved ones, and exchange gifts. Important places such as the streets, mosques, shrines, and residential areas are decorated with colorful lights. People sing poetry in praise of the Prophet as it is also believed that listening to these prayers gets mercy and heavenly rewards from the Almighty Allah.

The roots of celebrating this day go back to the early four Rashidun Caliphs of Islam. Usually, there are gatherings at dargahs/mosques to begin their day with a morning prayer, followed by night-long prayers. There are marches and parades as well as communal meals in the mosque. Sending Eid-e-Milad wishes via messages and e-cards is increasingly becoming popular. Overall, it is a good day to spend time with family and to tell kids inspiring stories and poems about the life of Prophet Muhammad, peace and blessings be upon him.

Eid Milad-un-Nabi-Mawlid Facts

  1. Mawlid shares both the events, birth and the death of Prophet Muhammad, peace and blessings be upon him.
  2. Muslims engage in donations and charity and arrange feasts that are served to the poor.
  3. Mawlid is known as Maouloud in West Africa.
  4. Mawlid was first declared an official holiday by the Ottomans in the year 1588.
  5. Sections within the Muslim community are split regarding the date of birth of the Prophet, peace, and blessings be upon him.
  6. Some sections of the Muslim community believe except Eid al-Fitr and Eid-e-Adha, no other events are to be celebrated as per the Islamic holy books.
  7. In Saudi Arabia and Qatar, Mawlid holidays and celebrations are forbidden.
  8. In countries where it is celebrated, people carry green banners, flags, tie green ribbons on their waist or head, and wear green-colored clothes on this day. The green color represents Islam and paradise.
  9. Gun salutes and religious chants are common sights on Mawlid in Pakistan.
  10. Mawlid is observed in India with night-long prayers and display of relics of the Prophet in Jammu & Kashmir; and rallies & parades in Telangana.

Regardless of the difference in observance, the day of Eid Milad un Nabi is a day of great importance in Islam and is spent thinking, reading, or listening about his extraordinary life and teachings that hold importance even many centuries later.

Milad-Un-Nabi 2021 FAQs

Why is Milad-un-Nabi important?

Milad un Nabi is an important day as it commemorates the birthday of the last Islamic Prophet, Prophet Muhammad, peace and blessings be upon him

What are the other names of Milad-un-Nabi?

Milad un Nabi is also popularly known as Eid Milad un Nabi, Mawlid, Mawlid an-Nabi ash-Sharif, and Eid e Milad.

What do Muslims do on Milad un Nabi?

On Mawlid, Muslims listen to the narration of the Prophet’s life and his teachings. It is believed that Mawlid is the day to seek mercy and forgiveness from Allah.

Is Milad un Nabi a government holiday?

In many countries with a significant Muslim population, Mawlid is a government declared a holiday. All government offices, schools, colleges, as well as business offices remain closed on this day. The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and Qatar however are an exception.

When is Milad un Nabi 2021?

Milad un Nabi will be begin on 18th October 2021 and will end on 19th October 2021.

Bhavna

My words find inspiration in the most mundane of the things — beads of a rosary, a rehal by the window, rings of incense smoke, and fallen tree leaves. When not dreaming, I crochet them into stories of times, places, & people.

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